Research from Shu Yang and Kate Stebe reveals liquid crystal "flowers" can be used as lenses
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Scientists and Engineers in the field of nanotechnology, more specifically Direct Assembly, are constantly seeking to evolve how we think about small scale structures. Recently, Pennergy's Shu Yang and Kate Stebe, alongside Randall Kamien and members of their respective labs have contributed to a new study that involves using liquid crystals as a medium for assembly. These crystals simplify the once complex pattern by mimicking  the three dimensions of a flower.  This approach has the potential to lend itself to several applications, namely the making of optical switches. In this design, the layers are made of transparent liquid crystal which radiates out from a central point.

Their research takes simplifies the complex pattern by mimicking the three-dimensions of a flower. This approach has the potential to lend itself to several applications, namely the making of optical switches. In this structure, the layers are made of transparent liquid crystal and radiate out from a central point, and can be used as a lens.

Their work was recently published in Physical Review X.

Read more at phys.org